Skipper





Phil Jones and his Dad
Age 24, 6 June 1962, Graduation Day with Dad

Philip T. Jones, at the age of 24 years, is seen here with his father, a picture taken following his graduation ceremony from the U.S. Naval Academy, on June 6, 1962. This was not just a proud moment for the Skipper, but it was also a very momentous experience for his father, watching his son he had allowed four years ago to join the United States Marine Corps from their home in Chicago, Ill. Skipper Jones enlisted into the Marine Corps and was assigned to the Marine Corps Recruit Depot, San Diego, CA. 
       The Skippers three Drill Instructors, at 2nd. Battalion, were Sgt. Coleman, Sgt. Hynes, and Corporal Snider, from Platoon Series 292. On September 1956, upon completion of his recruit training, Philip T. Jones graduated Honor Man of his Platoon, the highest single honor a recruit is able to receive upon graduation from training, which last any where from 12 weeks to 16 weeks, depending upon the situation of our Country's status, as the world happens to be. 
     PFC. Philip T. Jones received his orders upon graduation, telling him to report to the United States Naval Academy prep school, in preparation of receiving a college education, and a commission into the United States Marine Corps as a 2nd. Lt. USMC.
     For someone to accomplish this much and to go no further, would be an achievement hard for anyone to duplicate. Philip T. Jones, became company commander of Hotel Company, in August of 1968 through December of 1968. To catch up on some more accomplishments that made him the man we of Hotel Company 1968 have come to honor, respect, and acknowledge him in love, after some 32 years later, is a tribute which very few accomplished Commanders attain in their life times, and this tribute further carries on throughout the history of Hotel Company 2/1, 1st., Marine Division forever.


Top Risley with Capt Philip T. Jones CO

      While Hotel Company was under the command of Capt Philip T. Jones from July 1968 through December 1968, Hotel Company accomplished more in that time period with a minimal loss of life and casualties then during my entire tour from May 1968 through May 1969. It also developed a unique group of what was called "Killer Teams", the use of small size teams, 5 to 7 men, deployed in the back yard of the enemy without his knowledge.

     The concept was first tried when up North in the Cau Viet area outside Dong Ha South of the DMZ along the Vietnamese coast line, an area where 2/4 had earlier suffered heavy casualties in engagements with the communist North Vietnamese forces. While on a company size routine patrol, the Skipper stopped the company for what seemed to be a break in the patrol to rest and regain momentum. At this time, even unknown to elements of our own company, a squad size team of seven men withdrew into the jungle and remained concealed their while Hotel Company apparently continued on with its patrol. 

     This squad was given orders to remain out of sight and watch and have artillery support on hand. By the next day, the squad detected movement of  NVA troops coming out of a tree line totally unsuspecting that they were being observed and in the process of having an artillery barrage called in on top of them. A surprise that for once had truly caught them by surprise and cost them dearly. 

     Capt. Jones was a former enlisted man who also had the confidence in his enlisted men to follow his orders and he allowed them opportunities of striking the enemy without having to wait twenty minutes for permission from someone in the rear area who was totally unqualified to make the same judgment calls from a position of speculation as opposed to being on sight. None of this transpired which wasn't carefully monitored by himself the majority of the time, along with a qualified artillery officer to substantiate fire mission coordinates, in order to keep the innocent and friendly forces from in these areas from being harmed.

     This tactic used by Capt. Jones, conceived while he was assigned as a tactics Instructor at the Marine Corps Basic School and after his first our in Vietnam as Executive Officer of Kilo Company, Third Battalion 3d Marines tuned by the then Platoon Sergeant of the 3d Platoon Hotel Company SSgt King, a highly qualified "Bush Master" and teacher in the art of combat against the communist forces of North Vietnam proved successful beyond hope and  measure. The long term results were the dramatic halt of enemy ambushes on unsuspecting patrols, as well as stopping our Battalion area from being routinely attacked at will by enemy forces which had been operating with a free hand in our AO up until these tactics were deployed. This concept for the first time deprived the enemy of it's most vital weapons, intelligence and surprise. 

     His boldness and courage in the field with his troops was repeatedly demonstrated by his actions first hand against the enemy while leading his men as opposed to directing them from a safe haven in the rear. This trust which he bestowed upon his highly trained enlisted units, as well as his leadership abilities in the face of the enemy earned him then the respect and confidence in his abilities as commander and leader of his troops then, and now, thirty years later. 

      Captain Philip T. Jones by example and dedication to his troops and superiors achieving success after success has earned him the most covenant title a Marine can achieve, the title of a "Marines Marine". This title will forever remain in the hearts of those he so bravely commanded in battle and will also remain with him in peacetime. The men of Hotel Company, 2nd Battalion, 1st Marines, 1st Marine Division, will throughout their life times recognize Major Philip T. Jones USMC Retired, as their "Skipper" who they were fortunate to have served under his command To you Skipper we say Semper Fidelis, Served with Pride.


 The Skipper in the "Bush", leading his troops near "Hand Grenade Hill"   

 

Just Prior to the Skipper's departure from Hotel 2/1, those aren't beers!!!
 

 

Click on pictures to see Charleston Photo's.

click on picture to see some of Charleston Photo's.
The "Skipper" receiving a plaque from his troops.
 
 


 

Replica of plaque with actual inscription.

     Major Philip Thomas Jones, USMC was born in Chicago, Illinois on 19 November 1937, lived in Oak Park, Illinois where he attended high school and was a member of the swimming team. On June 13, 1956 Major Jones enlisted in the Marine Corps and was assigned to the Marine Corps Recruit Depot, San Diego, CA. He graduated "Honor Man" of his platoon and received the rank of Private First Class, (PFC.) a distinction awarded to the one outstanding recruit as an example of what it is to be a Marine, the best. He was offered the opportunity to attended the United States Naval Academy where he graduated on 6 June 1962. Upon completion of the Officers Basic School, Quantico, Virginia, Lieutenant Jones reported to the 1st Marine Division where he served with 3rd Bn., 1st Marines as an Infantry Platoon Commander. He later served with 2nd Bn., 1st Marines as a Weapons Platoon Commander and later deployed to the Republic of Vietnam where he served as Executive Officer for Company "K" 3rd Bn., 3rd Marines and as Battalion Adjutant for 1st Bn., 1st Marines. 

     After completing his tour in the Republic of Vietnam in Feb. 1966, Captain Jones was assigned to the Marine Corps Schools, Quantico, Virginia as a Staff Platoon Commander and later as a Tactics Instructor at the Officers Basic School. Returning to the Republic of Vietnam in June of 1968, he served as Commanding Officer of Company "H", 2nd Bn., 1st Marines. Completing his assignment in April of 1969, Captain Jones was assigned to Headquarters, U.S. Marine Corps, Washington, D.C. as a personnel monitor. In February 1972, Captain Jones was assigned as a student in the Amphibious Warfare School at Quantico, Virginia, and upon completion of that school, was assigned as Commanding Officer, Company "D" Marine Security Guard Battalion  (State Department)  in the Republic of Panama. 

     Upon his return to the United States in August of 1974, Major Jones was assigned as the G-4 Plans Officer for the 1st Marine Division at Camp Pendleton, California. Following that assignment he was transferred to Marine Corps Base, Camp Butler, Okinawa, Japan in September 1976 as the G-4 Plans Officer.

     Major Philip Thomas Jones, USMC was born in Chicago, Illinois on 19 November 1937, lived in Oak Park, Illinois where he attended high school and was a member of the swimming team. On June 13, 1956 Major Jones enlisted in the Marine Corps and was assigned to the Marine Corps Recruit Depot, San Diego, CA. He graduated "Honor Man" of his platoon and received the rank of Private First Class, (PFC.) a distinction awarded to the one outstanding recruit as an example of what it is to be a Marine, the best. He was offered the opportunity to attended the United States Naval Academy where he graduated on 6 June 1962. Upon completion of the Officers Basic School, Quantico, Virginia, Lieutenant Jones reported to the 1st Marine Division where he served with 3rd Bn., 1st Marines as an Infantry Platoon Commander. He later served with 2nd Bn., 1st Marines as a Weapons Platoon Commander and later deployed to the Republic of Vietnam where he served as Executive Officer for Company "K" 3rd Bn., 3rd Marines and as Battalion Adjutant for 1st Bn., 1st Marines. 

     After completing his tour in the Republic of Vietnam in Feb. 1966, Captain Jones was assigned to the Marine Corps Schools, Quantico, Virginia as a Staff Platoon Commander and later as a Tactics Instructor at the Officers Basic School. Returning to the Republic of Vietnam in June of 1968, he served as Commanding Officer of Company "H", 2nd Bn., 1st Marines. Completing his assignment in April of 1969, Captain Jones was assigned to Headquarters, U.S. Marine Corps, Washington, D.C. as a personnel monitor. In February 1972, Captain Jones was assigned as a student in the Amphibious Warfare School at Quantico, Virginia, and upon completion of that school, was assigned as Commanding Officer, Company "D" Marine Security Guard Battalion  (State Department)  in the Republic of Panama. 

     Upon his return to the United States in August of 1974, Major Jones was assigned as the G-4 Plans Officer for the 1st Marine Division at Camp Pendleton, California. Following that assignment he was transferred to Marine Corps Base, Camp Butler, Okinawa, Japan in September 1976 as the G-4 Plans Officer. 

     Returning to the United States in September of 1977, Major Jones assumed duties as Executive Officer, Marine Barracks, Naval Weapons Station, Charleston, South Carolina, as Commanding Officer. 

     As Commanding Officer, he assumed responsibility for one of the Marine Corps largest Marine Barracks. The mission of the Marine Barracks is to provide security for the Polaris Missile Facility Atlantic, the Naval Weapons Station and the Naval Station, Charleston, South Carolina. 

     In addition to numerous awards and citations, Major Jones personal decorations included the Bronze Star with Combat "V", the Navy Commendation Medal, and the Purple Heart. He is married to the former Carol Marie Lombardo of Fountain Valley, California. There are six children, Kevin, Tom, and Brian Jones, and Anthony, David and Angela Segalla. They reside in Summerville, South Carolina. 

     Major Jones is a partner and half owner of the Olde Towne Mortgage Company, LLC operating out of Summerville, South Carolina. He enjoys and participates actively in sports excelling in tennis and scuba diving, he taught scuba for ten years for the PADI organization. Although Major Jones is not personally from a military family, his father served in WW I in the Army Signal Corps, and he had two brothers who served in the Army Air Corps during WW II. His oldest brother John lives in Vista, California, his middle brother Tom was killed during the war.

     There are many web pages on the Internet which represent every aspect of this countries military service, yet you would be hard pressed to find one that destinquishly pays tribute to their commanding officer. Major Jones was in 1968 an extraordinary leader of men and a commander who went out of his way to be in the field, or bush, as often as he possibly could, not just to better coordinate the movement of his troops, but also to set an example to his men of what it truly means to be a Combat Infantry Officer in the United States Marine Corps. Major Jones today still maintains personal contact with the men who served him proudly thirty years ago and who today proudly exhibit their pride in the opportunity in having served under his command then and to say thank you Skipper for a job well done by honoring him with this tribute about a man who today represents the character and courage of what it takes to be a leader in the United States Marine Corps. 

Semper Fi. 
  (Served with Pride...) 

The Men of Hotel Company, 2nd Bn. 1st Marines, 1st Marine Division. 1968
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